Report: Google earns 78% of $36.7B US search ad revenues, soon to be 80%

Google’s domination of the US search ad market isn’t letting up. Thanks to mobile in particular, Google will take 77.8 percent of US search ad revenues this year. By next year, for every dollar spent on search advertising in the US, an even eight dimes will go to Google. The remaining 20 cents will be split up among Microsoft, Yahoo, Yelp, Amazon, Ask and AOL, according to eMarketer’s latest report on the US digital ad market.
“Google’s dominance in search, especially mobile search, is largely coming from the growing tendency of consumers to turn to their smartphones to look up everything from the details of a product to directions,” said eMarketer forecasting analyst Monica Peart. “Google and mobile search as a whole will continue to benefit from this behavioral shift.”
Overall, search spending in the US is expected to increase 24 percent over the next three years, from $36.69 billion in 2017 to $45.63 billion in 2019.
Microsoft’s US search ad

Search Engine Land Source

Yahoo Gemini launches retargeting for search and native ads in US

nevodka / Shutterstock.com
After several months of testing with over 100 advertisers, Yahoo has launched custom audience targeting for search and native image and video ads on Yahoo Gemini in the US.
Yahoo first announced custom audience targeting in September, and has been testing it with advertisers since January. Advertisers can retarget site visitors — segmented by page visited or action taken — or import app customer lists for retargeting using mobile advertiser IDs.
Audience creation in Gemini is fairly straightforward. From the Tools tab, click Custom Audience to set up an audience of past site visitors or app customers.
The post Yahoo Gemini launches retargeting for search and native ads in US appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Search Engine Land Source

Google drove 95 percent of US smartphone paid search clicks in Q1 [Merkle]

 

If there’s one theme to be taken from Merkle’s Q1 Digital Marketing Report, it’s that Google is miles ahead of Bing and Yahoo in driving and monetizing mobile search traffic.
Driven almost entirely by Google, mobile paid search continues to grow, with smartphone click share rising from 33 percent in Q4 2015 to 39 percent in Q1 2016 overall. On Google, 57 percent of paid search clicks came from mobile in Q1. Overall, desktop paid search clicks were flat and tablet clicks were off five percent year over year, compared to 101-percent growth for smartphone clicks.
Google paid search saw solid growth in Q1 among Merkle’s client base, with spend rising 25 percent year over year as click volume increased 33 percent. Overall, CPCs fell six percent as mobile click share continued to rise. Non-brand search ad clicks grew 42 percent, and spend on non-brand keywords rose 24 percent, the highest growth rate seen in six quarters.
Combined spend across Bing Ads and Yahoo Gemini fell

Search Engine Land Source

Yahoo Search App For iPhone Gets A Bit More “Now” With Personalized Content

nevodka / Shutterstock.com
Yesterday, Yahoo introduced an updated search app for the iPhone. It offers a range of new capabilities and utility. Overall, Yahoo has done a nice job with the UI and search experience.
I haven’t systematically compared it to Google or Bing mobile search experiences. But in my 24 hours of casual usage, it appears to perform quite a bit like the Google app in terms of look and feel.
In the setup process, Yahoo wants access to your contacts, calendar and location so that it can deliver a deeper and more personalized experience. It also wants you to sign in to your Yahoo account for the full experience, though that’s not required.

In addition to web search results, the on-device content enables users to retrieve the following in search results:

Package delivery notifications
Friends’ contact information
Hotel and rental car reservation details
Upcoming calendar events

These features and capabilities make it more like Google Now.
Although I haven’t found this yet, the Yahoo app

Search Engine Land Source

What Does Yahoo’s New Google Partnership Mean For SEO’s Future?

For the past 15 years or so, the search engine hierarchy has been pretty clear: Google is the dominating force in the search world, with all other platforms solidly behind.
Bing came onto the scene a little late but has grown steadily to reach a search market share of more than 20 percent, chipping away at Google’s still-dominant 66-percent position.
What’s interesting is that for the past few years, Bing has also powered Google’s next most popular rival, Yahoo. Though serving users with a Yahoo-branded skin and platform, the real “guts” of the engine were offered by Bing.
Now, Yahoo has signed a new partnership with Google, reuniting two of the once-fiercest competitors in the search world and pointing toward the future of search engine relations.
Details Of The Deal
The Yahoo-Google deal apparently arose after the terms of its deal with Bing were renegotiated back in March. Under the new deal terms, Yahoo had the right to seek search ad provisions from

Search Engine Land Source

US Paid Search Ad Spend Growth Slows To 12%, In Part Due To A Still-Nascent Yahoo Gemini

Search spend growth in the US slowed for the second consecutive quarter in the 3Q15, according to IgnitionOne’s latest digital marketing report. The firm points to expected seasonality, as well as to the fact that advertisers are holding back from Yahoo’s still-limited ad platform, Gemini.
As a result of Yahoo’s and Bing’s transition after renegotiating their search deal, “a significant portion of traffic is out of reach of most advertisers due to Gemini limitations. This may cause “budgets to decrease because of traffic loss or to increased inefficiency,” the report finds. The firm believes advertisers will continue to underfund Gemini for some time but expects to see slow adoption, particularly for brand and core terms.
Because of the traffic shifts, IgnitionOne did not report on the individual performance of Bing and Yahoo but said Google ad spend was up 14 percent year over year among the client set measured.
Though growth slowed over two quarters, the report notes that the overall year-over-year growth of 12 percent is

Search Engine Land Source

Google Controls 65 Percent Of Search, Bing 33 Percent — [comScore]

In the simplest terms, the world of organic search is roughly two-thirds Google, one third Bing. Those are the July 2015 “powered by” numbers provided by comScore for the US search market.
In terms of non-network share, Bing saw a tiny 0.1 percent gain in July and so did Ask. Google was flat with 64 percent, unchanged for the past three months. Yet Google’s market share is down from 67.6 percent a year ago.

Together Bing and Yahoo combined in July for 33.1 percent market share. AOL will soon be a Bing-powered search property. If that were the case today, the share of Bing and Bing-powered searches would represent 34.3 percent of all query volume.
The post Google Controls 65 Percent Of Search, Bing 33 Percent — [comScore] appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Search Engine Land Source

Yahoo Buys Social Commerce Site Polyvore

Yahoo announced this afternoon that it was buying social shopping destination Polyvore. Yahoo said in its release that the acquisition would “strengthen Yahoo’s digital magazines and verticals through the incorporation of community and commerce, and together Yahoo and Polyvore will power native shopping ads that drive traffic and sales to retailers.”
There’s also a strong mobile shopping angle here too.
Yahoo did not disclose the purchase price but said that after the acquisition closes that the Polyvore brand will continue. It won’t become the new Yahoo Shopping — although I suspect it will get an overhaul.

Polyvore disclosed at one point that its audience was more than 70 percent female. The vast majority are under 45, with more than 50 percent of its audience under the age of 34. The company also says that its “average basket size across retail partners is over $383, which is higher than other leading social networks combined.”
Yahoo sees a range of uses for Polyvore as indicated in the quote above:

Digital

Search Engine Land Source

Yahoo Buys Social Commerce Site Polyvore

Yahoo announced this afternoon that it was buying social shopping destination Polyvore. Yahoo said in its release that the acquisition would “strengthen Yahoo’s digital magazines and verticals through the incorporation of community and commerce, and together Yahoo and Polyvore will power native shopping ads that drive traffic and sales to retailers.”
There’s also a strong mobile shopping angle here too.
Yahoo did not disclose the purchase price but said that after the acquisition closes that the Polyvore brand will continue. It won’t become the new Yahoo Shopping — although I suspect it will get an overhaul.

Polyvore disclosed at one point that its audience was more than 70 percent female. The vast majority are under 45, with more than 50 percent of its audience under the age of 34. The company also says that its “average basket size across retail partners is over $383, which is higher than other leading social networks combined.”
Yahoo sees a range of uses for Polyvore as indicated in the quote above:

Digital

Search Engine Land Source