Why crawl budget and URL scheduling might impact rankings in website migrations

Earlier this year, Google’s Gary Illyes stated that 30x redirects (301, 302, etc.) do not result in a loss or dilution of PageRank. As you can imagine, many SEOs have greeted this claim with skepticism.
In a recent Webmaster Central Office Hours Hangout, I asked Google’s John Mueller whether perhaps the skepticism was because when SEOs experience loss of visibility during migrations, they might not realize that all signals impacting rankings haven’t passed to the new pages yet, so they assume that PageRank was lost.
Mueller’s reply:
Yeah, I mean, any time you do a bigger change on your website — if you redirect a lot of URLs, if you go from one domain to another, if you change your site structure — then all of that does take time for things to settle down. So, we can follow that pretty quickly, we can definitely forward the signals there, but that doesn’t mean it will happen from one day to the next.
During a migration, Googlebot needs to collect huge

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Help! I just launched a new website and my search rankings tanked!

Imagine this nightmare scenario: you’re on the verge of launching your newly redesigned website, and you’re already anticipating new leads and returning customers. You’ve spent countless hours working through every last detail before even considering unveiling your new creation to the world. The big day arrives, and you give the green light to launch.
Suddenly, you realize you forgot to plan for one crucial element: the SEO best practices that you had so carefully incorporated into your old website.
Unfortunately, this is not just a nightmare that can be forgotten once you’ve had your morning coffee, but something I’ve seen happen to countless small businesses over my 10 years as the owner of an SEO and online marketing agency.
Your redesigned website was meant to give your business a new lease on life, but instead, you’ve destroyed your organic search rankings and traffic overnight. When you change your site without thoroughly thinking through the SEO implications, you might do something harmful like throw away

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Changing domain names in 2016: 10 easily overlooked steps that can save SEO

I help a lot of companies with the SEO aspects of their website redesigns and CMS migrations.
As many webmasters know (or find out through hard experience), both redesigns and migrations can be catastrophic if not handled correctly. Unfortunately, you can run into many gremlins during a migration, from technical problems to botched redirection plans to dropping URLs. And when that happens, you can lose search equity, rankings and traffic. I’ve helped some companies that reached out to me after losing 60 to 70 percent of their traffic based on a botched migration. It’s not pretty, to say the least.
But what about simply changing domain names? If you are just moving from one domain name to another, without a redesign or CMS migration, it must be much easier, right? Well, it is easier, but there are still things that can go wrong. And the more moving pieces are involved with your site, the more variables you need to

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Google begins massive migrations of their blogs from blogspot.com to googleblog.com

John Mueller, a Google Webmaster Trends Analyst, announced that Google is migrating all their official blogs off the blogspot.com domain name and onto the more official googleblog.com domain name. The reason is to help users understand that these are official blogs managed and operated by Google.
The migration began with Google’s very own Google Webmaster Blog which is now available at https://webmasters.googleblog.com/. The original URL was googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com, and now that redirects using a 301 redirect to webmasters.googleblog.com.
Google plans on migrating all of their blogs to googleblog.com over the next several months.
John Mueller added that “the previous address will redirect to the new domain, so your bookmarks and links will continue to work.” The RSS feeds and comment URLs will not redirect, and you will need to resubscribe to those separately.
Of course, many SEOs are eager to see how the migration goes from an SEO perspective for Google.
The post Google begins massive migrations of their blogs from blogspot.com to

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About To Launch A WordPress Site? Here’s What You Need To Know About SEO

WordPress is the most widely used content management system (CMS) in the world — roughly half of sites that use a CMS use WordPress.
There is good reason for WordPress’ popularity. It’s versatile, easy to use and highly customizable, due to the numerous plugins and themes available.
Many believe that using WordPress to host a site automatically guarantees good SEO. As the belief goes, all you need to do is start a WordPress site, and your SEO will take care of itself.
It doesn’t work that way. If you’re on the cusp of launching a new WordPress site, here’s what you need to know to maximize search engine visibility. My goal in this article is to provide several overarching strategies (rather than a technical how-to) that will improve your search potential.
1. WordPress Is Not An Automatic SEO Solution
First, let me reiterate the fact that WordPress is not an SEO silver bullet. The value of WordPress for SEO is that it is simple and intuitive. The platform

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SEO Disasters: Preventing The Unthinkable

Like any SEO veteran, I can recount my share of horror stories — launching Google Analytics and noticing that sudden, sickening drop in traffic.
Sometimes, sudden drops in traffic may be the result of an algorithm changes (such as Panda). However, in many cases, they are caused by bugs, inadvertent changes or overambitious engineers with a little bit of SEO knowledge.
In this article, I will examine three real-life case studies and outline the steps necessary for SEO disaster prevention.
Case #1: “Something Bad Is Happening To My Website.”
I was at a company offsite, and my phone had been vibrating with several calls. I left my meeting and saw that my good friend (let’s call him “Tony”) had called several times and left a message: “I think something bad happening to my website. Traffic is crashing. Some sort of SEO problem.”
Tony runs iFly, an extremely successful airport information site. Like many of us, he is very dependent on Google traffic; an SEO issue would be a big

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From oDesk To Upwork: How To Migrate A Domain And Not Kill Your SEO

When I was told that our client, oDesk, was planning on rebranding their company to Upwork, the “domain migration” alarm bells immediately went off in my head.
As Search Engine Land readers know, these pages are littered with horror stories of domain migrations that have done serious SEO damage. For instance:

How One Brand Switched One Million URLs and Lived To Tell About It: 5 Questions With HomeAdvisor.com
You Don’t Have To Be Nuts To Worry About Changing Your Domain Name

While the basics of SEO for domain migrations are straightforward, betting your business that both Google and your team will get it right is, in fact, a big bet. One read of that HomeAdvisor post should be enough to put off anyone from attempting the switch.
So naturally, when oDesk presented the idea of changing domains, my feedback was that they should set expectations correctly internally, put a plan in place to do everything right, and be pleasantly surprised if/when their organic traffic

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