SEO case study: Zero to 100,000 visitors in 12 months

You need more traffic.
More visitors on your site means more impressions, more signups, more purchases — more revenue.
But how do you capture more traffic from search results that are becoming more crowded, more diverse, and evolving in the way they are delivered?
With SEO, of course!
Today, I want to share a process we’ve developed at Siege Media to earn links and visibility, and to increase web traffic for our clients. I’m going to walk through how we built a site’s SEO strategy from the ground up — growing from zero visitors to 100,000 — and share key takeaways that you can apply to your own strategy.

The general outline of our strategy was:

Start slow and take advantage of “easy wins.”
Focus on securing a handful of strategic links to important pages.
Establish passive link acquisition channels to build momentum.
Be intentional about content creation and its impact on search.
Level up over time, and target higher-value opportunities.

Let’s dive into the case study.
Note: We had control over

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More content, less traffic: Part II

At the end of last year, I shared the results from three of our projects showcasing how we had increased traffic by reducing a website’s overall page count. Simply put, many of our clients had way too much content — pages and pages of content that not only didn’t generate traffic, but also had the unintended consequence of hurting traffic sitewide by diluting keyword and topical relevance. By consolidating pages and reducing the total page count of these sites, we saw some dramatic improvements in overall traffic.
The purpose of this article is to lay out an analytical framework to answer an important question: How do I determine if I should continue to increase the content on my site?
First, I should note that I work in the hypercompetitive legal industry — and lawyers have been belching out web content at a stupendous rate after hearing time and time again that “Content is king” and that “Google likes fresh

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Voice search and SEO: Why B2B marketers need to pay attention now

Voice search is commonly discussed in the context of local and B2C SEO, but it’s being used for more than just getting directions to nearby restaurants or hearing the next step in a recipe while cooking. Voice search is being adopted for a variety of purposes, and its influence on B2B decision-makers is growing as well.
By looking at who’s using voice search, why they’re using it, and where they’re using it, it becomes very clear that the impact of voice search on B2B SEO is inevitable. Adoption of the technology is on the rise, so it’s time for brands to begin optimizing for voice search.
Who’s using voice technology?
As early as 2014, 55 percent of teens and 41 percent of adults were already using voice technology daily. Adults use it to dictate texts, illustrating a desire to avoid typing on small devices. Teens use it to get help with homework, demonstrating an early adoption of voice technology for

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The role of traditional public relations in SEO

If you’re doing search engine optimization (SEO) properly today, then a significant portion of your effort will overlap with traditional public relations (PR).
This is because over the last few years, Google has minimized the effects of easily gameable ranking signals and refined their algorithm to better represent user experience. In other words, websites that satisfy their users tend to rank better than those that do not.
Inbound links are still a critical component of any SEO campaign, but the easy link-building tactics of the past have been wiped off the board, largely thanks to Google’s Penguin update(s). This includes buying links, guest blogging at scale, embedding links in plugins or themes and more.
The only type remaining as valuable and effective over the long term are the proverbial Holy Grail of link building: natural editorial links from high-traffic, authoritative websites.
And therein lies the challenge: How do we earn these coveted editorial links? Well, it’s a two-part equation.
The first part

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E-commerce companies can improve revenue by following these 5 tips

E-commerce websites can seem overwhelming to manage, but effective information architecture, SEO and content marketing strategies can make a huge difference. Nothing about the advice I offer below is complicated, difficult or expensive. After learning these simple strategies, please share them with anyone else who might benefit from them. It may even be someone inside your own company or organization!
The powerful impact of SEO harnessed to content marketing
SEO can be a powerful tool. I’ve seen clients double — or even triple — revenue by attracting more organic search traffic. This is often followed by a sales boost offline at local stores as more customers find their e-commerce website on a Google search.
Through a decade of consulting on SEO for leading e-commerce web shops in Norway and international Fortune 500 corporations, I’ve picked up some precious insights to share with you. Let’s take a closer look at winning strategies of successful web shops and e-commerce companies.
1. Successful e-commerce companies use search & analytics data to

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3 steps to overcoming site issues that impact performance

Over the past two decades, as the online world has experienced exponential growth, websites have become increasingly complex. Web pages have evolved from simple HTML pages with a few graphics to responsive, personalized pages that focus on the user experience. In tandem with the growing sophistication of websites, customers’ quality standards have also matured.
For example, customers have come to expect that websites load quickly, regardless of the device they are using. In 2009, a mere 5 percent of people expected load times of one second or less on e-commerce sites. Six years later, in 2015, a survey found that this number had increased to nearly a third of all customers, with 30 percent expecting pages to load in one second or less.
As web pages have evolved, however, the potential for problems has increased. Even seemingly small issues can drastically impact site performance, hindering visitors’ ability to find the content and information they want. Such site issues can quickly damage the reputation

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For e-commerce success: SEO > aesthetics

The world of e-commerce optimization is vast and complex, and it demands a particular level of attention in order to function and perform correctly.
Over the last 10 years, I have had the opportunity to manage a variety of enterprise-level e-commerce websites that offer everything from athletic gear to office supplies.
Regardless of the intended audience, most e-commerce sites suffer from similar optimization issues. These issues prevent them from maximizing their exposure to qualified traffic and the related revenue.
Usually, these problems are connected to how business stakeholders approach the development of their e-commerce platform, placing user experience and aesthetics over search engine optimization (SEO).
When brands focus on building e-commerce environments that are attractive and functional but ignore or forget about SEO, they immediately lose opportunities to attract and convert new customers from organic channels.
The good news is that by adhering to the following e-commerce optimization recommendations, you can create an environment that is functional and attractive and introduces your brand

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Micro-moments and beyond: Understanding and optimizing for consumer intent

Google introduced the concept of micro-moments over a year ago, and since then, the company has consistently published supporting information as it relates to specific industries and user behavior across content platforms.
If you’re unfamiliar with micro-moments, they’re essentially a way of framing a user’s path to purchase or to conversion, with specific focus on mobile and the needs or questions users search on Google along with way. The concept of micro-moments is easily digestible and provides a great way of conducting and organizing keyword research, something search marketing practitioners and decision-makers alike can certainly appreciate.
At our agency, ZOG Digital, we’ve been developing ways to comprehensively identify micro-moment opportunities for clients while mapping and optimizing to the consumer’s conversion path. The following is a high-level look at our approach and a few of the resources we use.
1. Identifying micro-moments: The consumer journey
Before you can identify micro-moment opportunities, you must understand the structure or user path and adapt it to

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The SEO power of portfolio entries, case studies & testimonials

SEO and content marketing can be tough for small businesses. Creating content that answers the frequently asked questions in your industry may not be too difficult, but getting it found in search engines is not so easy if you are a small local player. Even if you could rank a piece of content nationally, would it turn into business? Could you handle the influx of leads if it did?
The digital marketing channels and tactics you use are a strategic decision — and in many cases, traditional content marketing is not the best choice for small local businesses. This is a different story for SaaS (software as a service) companies and the like, which can easily scale users and deliver their product on a national or international basis. But for the small local guys, traditional content marketing can lead to a lot of head-scratching and wasted effort.
The SEO power of portfolios
This is not to say that content marketing is completely

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It’s scary how many ways SEO can go wrong

We’ve all had those moments of absolute terror where we just want to crawl into the fetal position, cry and pretend the problem doesn’t exist. Unfortunately, as SEOs, we can’t stay this way for long. Instead, we have to suck it up and quickly resolve whatever went terribly wrong.
There are moments you know you messed up, and there are times a problem can linger for far too long without your knowledge. Either way, the situation is scary — and you have to work hard and fast to fix whatever happened.
Things Google tells you not to do
There are many things Google warns about in their Webmaster Guidelines:

Automatically generated content
Participating in link schemes
Creating pages with little or no original content
Sneaky redirects
Hidden text or links
Doorway pages
Scraped content
Participating in affiliate programs without adding sufficient value
Loading pages with irrelevant keywords
Creating pages with malicious behavior, such as phishing or installing viruses, trojans or other badware
Abusing rich snippets markup
Sending automated queries to Google

Unfortunately, people can

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