3 ways to use search query data from Google Search Console

In my last column, I covered how you can use Google’s Search Console to learn about the health of your website.
Search Console has another helpful report, called Search Analytics, which gives you an overview of how your website is performing in Google’s organic (non-paid) search results — namely, it shows some of the search queries people used to click through to your website.
In this column, I’ll explain how to read the report. I’ll also share a few simple strategies on how small business owners can use it to improve a website’s non-paid Google search results and website marketing in general.
How to read the Search Analytics report
To access the report, log into Search Console, and then click “Search Traffic” in the left-hand navigation. Search Analytics is the first report listed within this menu option. If you’re not able to access Search Console, it may be because you have to verify your website first.
The Search Analytics report enables you

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Weathering the Google storms

A good friend of mine and truly the best SEO expert I have had the privilege working with, Gregory Gromov, once referred to the Google algorithm updates and tests as “Google storms.” The coined phrase made all the sense in the world. Per Gregory, a solid SEO program provides the ballast to weather the storm, but if a storm hits and flips you over… well, it is time to right the ship.
A Google algorithm update is actually a rare opportunity. While in some cases it may appear to be more of a nightmare than a dream come true, understanding how to capitalize on the event is key to succeeding in SEO — and as your program matures, you will look forward to the updates.
The following is a process I have used for years to evaluate Google updates at a site level to glean new opportunities for improvement and to determine what is already working. This is a

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How to use Google Tag Manager to show your clients results

Are you tired of asking your web developer to add code, snippets, pixels or scripts to your site so you can track remarketing, conversions, analytics and more? Google Tag Manager (GTM) allows you to add or update tags without having to bother your developer.
Google Tag Manager gives you control over how your tags are defined and how they fire. GTM involves a little bit of a learning curve, but once you understand the basics, you’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. If you’re an SEO who hasn’t yet delved into tracking codes (I know you’re out there, and it’s okay!), now’s the time to start.
Using tracking code will help you measure the results of your marketing campaigns — essentially, you’ll be able to show the results that your digital marketing efforts are making. And don’t worry, you don’t have to be a programmer to dig in. As an added bonus, you can use GTM to manage your clients’ campaigns as

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How To Replace Google’s (Not Provided) Data To Strike SEO Gold

While it is certainly useful to review organic keyword data in Google Webmaster Tools, it’s not a patch on the level of insightful detail once achievable in Google Analytics back in the days before Google’s move to 100% secure search (a.k.a. “not provided”). I’ve written about the importance of replacing this data before, but given the feedback I’ve received, it’s clear that more detail is in demand.
Mapping traffic behavior for particular keyword phrases though from landing page to exit, or through the conversion funnel, allows for much more powerful insights to be derived. Care for an example? OK.
Let’s say you’re a retailer trying to work out why your purchases for a particular product have fallen off a cliff over the last month. You can see that that all traffic sources are still at the same level. Filtering by channel shows that organic traffic is suddenly bouncing 200% more than in the previous month and is exiting the funnel to contribute

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