Google’s AMP Project announces new consent component ahead of GDPR compliance deadline

With the deadline for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) fast approaching, Google’s AMP team has announced a component to enable publishers to surface a user consent notification for sites using the mobile-friendly framework.
From the announcement:
The features to be launched include the ability to show choices in user interface notices via “accept” and “reject” semantics, and configuration of AMP element behaviors in response to users’ choices.
The GitHub issue page details the component’s format and configuration options, along with future feature suggestions. As the issues surrounding GDPR consent and compliance are complicated — including acquiring per-usage consent (e.g., publishers need to acquire separate consent for users being tracked for both first-party and third-party purposes) — the project team is encouraging publishers and vendors to participate in the component’s development so that support will be available for as many integrations as possible. They particularly note existing support within AMP for these types of features and state that user consent may need

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Google now removing medical records from its search results

Google is now purging private medical information from their search results. Bloomberg reported the change in Google’s removal policies, which adds a single line that reads:
Confidential, personal medical records of private people
Google did not give much information to Bloomberg about the change, only telling Bloomberg that they have “confirmed the changes do not affect search advertising.” Google declined to comment further on why they are making this change now.
Google lists very few examples of information they will remove content from their index, including:

national identification numbers like US Social Security Number, Argentine Single Tax Identification Number, Brazil Cadastro de pessoas Físicas, Korea Resident Registration Number, China Resident Identity Card and more.
bank account numbers.
credit card numbers.
images of signatures.
nude or sexually explicit images that were uploaded or shared without your consent.
confidential, personal medical records of private people.

Here is a screen shot of the removal page:

The post Google now removing medical records from its search results appeared first on Search Engine

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Google reports more than 40K government requests for user data during 2nd half of 2015

Google has released its latest transparency report update, reporting 40,677 requests for user data from governments around the world.
According to the latest numbers, there were over 5,000 more requests during the second half of 2015 compared to January through June of 2015, with 81,311 total users/accounts specified.
Requests for user data by reporting period

Of the more than 100 countries listed on the transparency report, the United States had the most government requests for user data and account information at 12,523, followed by Germany with 7,491 requests and France with 4,174 requests.
Google gave itself a pat on the back on its latest Google Public Policy blog post, noting it had led the charge for global transparency around government surveillance laws.
We helped create the Reform Government Surveillance coalition to encourage Congress and the executive branch to take steps to modernize US surveillance laws, further protect the privacy and data security rights of all users, including those outside the US and

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Google Updates User Ads Settings When Signed In Or Out

Google has updated the format of ads settings pages where users can exercise some control over how their data is used for ad targeting from Google ad systems. This is the place to go to find out what age and gender Google thinks you are and what kinds of things you’re interested in for ad targeting purposes. The last significant overhaul of the Ads Settings pages occurred in 2013. Google now shows separate pages depending on whether you’re signed in or out.
In effect, there are three places you’ll have to sign out, if desired: the signed-in page, the signed-out page, and finally, the display network page, because different information is used for ad targeting “depending on how you’re interacting with Google and whether you’re signed in with your Google account,” Google explains on the support page.
If you’re not signed into a Google account, these are the two options you’ll see:
Options for signed-out users.
The first choice is to opt in

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