Google’s Page Speed Update does not impact indexing

Google’s Page Speed Update won’t impact how Google indexes your mobile or desktop content; it will only affect how the mobile pages are ranked in the Google mobile search results. To be clear, indexing and ranking are two separate things, as Google explains clearly in the How Search Works portal.
We are covering this again because there appears to be some confusion around the Page Speed Update and whether it will impact indexing. Both John Mueller and Gary Illyes of Google chimed in to explain that this specific algorithm will have no impact on indexing.
Here are those tweets:

The mobile speed update affects only ranking in mobile search results; it’s independent of the indexing.
— John ☆.o(≧▽≦)o.☆ (@JohnMu) January 31, 2018

Why would indexing be related to speed? (I’m kinda confused how this was connected, wonder if we need to update something on our side to make it clearer)
— John ☆.o(≧▽≦)o.☆ (@JohnMu) January 31, 2018

Slow pages can get into the index.

Search Engine Land Source

FAQs on new Google Speed Update: AMP pages, Search Console notifications & desktop only pages

Google has just announced its latest algorithm update, named the Speed Update, that will be launching in July of this year. We asked Google several questions about this update, including how this impacts desktop pages, whether pages with AMP URLs but slow canonical URLs will be impacted, if webmasters will get Search Console notifications and more.
Here are the questions and answers from a Google spokesperson:
1. Are you still going to be using the desktop speed factor for the desktop index?
Correct, no changes to announce for desktop.
2. With the mobile-first index, will desktop rankings use mobile page speed and not use desktop page speed?
No, this change is about the mobile search results. As mentioned in our mobile-first indexing blog post, while our index will be built from mobile documents, we’re going to continue to build a great search experience for all users, whether they come from mobile or desktop devices.
3. What about the sites that get the “unavailable”

Search Engine Land Source

Leading up to the mobile-first index, Google has some advice

Kashin / Shutterstock.com
We all know the Google mobile first index is coming soon, probably in the next few months or so. To prepare, it seems like Google is encouraging webmasters to go responsive with their web sites.
Google has just published a how-to on moving your m-dot site to responsive. The techniques are pretty basic but it is an excellent reminder that while Google supports many mobile implementations, they do recommend responsive. In fact, Google has recommended that if you are switching to responsive, do it before the mobile first rollout.
Here are the steps Google wrote to move from m-dot to responsive:

Get your responsive site ready
Configure 301 redirects on the old mobile URLs to point to the responsive versions (the new pages). These redirects need to be done on a per-URL basis, individually from each mobile URLs to the responsive URLs.
Remove any mobile-URL specific configuration your site might have, such as conditional redirects or

Search Engine Land Source

Google temporarily disables ‘not mobile-friendly’ label in search results due to bug

Kashin / Shutterstock.com
Google has confirmed that they have temporarily disabled the ‘not mobile-friendly’ label in the mobile search results due to a bug. John Mueller of Google said that Google has turned “the label off for now” but it “should be ok soon.”
This is in response to Google mislabeling pages as not mobile-friendly over the past 24- hours in the mobile search results. Even AMP pages were labeled as not being mobile-friendly. John Mueller said that “this is a bug on our side” and Google is working on fixing it.
Here is a screen shot of Google labeling an AMP page as not mobile-friendly:

Here is a screen shot of an AT&T page being marked as not mobile friendly:

But the Google mobile friendly testing tool showed it at the same time as being mobile friendly:

So this is clearly a bug, Google said it is an issue on their end, and for now, they have turned off the label from

Search Engine Land Source

SEO in 2017: Mobile optimization as a competitive advantage

In 2016, the inevitable happened, and mobile overtook desktop as the primary device used to access websites. This didn’t come as a huge surprise because, as far back as 2015, Google reported that more searches were conducted on mobile than on any other device category.
In many industries, this may be conservative and, at the agency I head up in the UK, Bowler Hat, our B2C clients are seeing up to 85 percent of all site sessions conducted on mobile devices.
Suffice it to say, mobile has well and truly arrived. Yet, while responsive design has been around for a while now and is fairly well-established, the majority of sites tend to fall down on usability. That is, the majority of sites are still built for desktop and then dialed back for mobile. That form-fill that was mildly annoying on desktop is an absolute pig on mobile. Even if it is responsive.
This is not good enough in the mobile-first world we are

Search Engine Land Source

Google begins mobile-first indexing, using mobile content for all search rankings

Kashin / Shutterstock.com
Google has begun testing its mobile-first index, which will primarily look at the mobile version of your website for its ranking signals and fall back on the desktop version when there is no mobile version.
We expected this was coming and even heard about it over a year ago, but this is the first time Google has posted details about the mobile-first index on their own blog.
Most of Google searches are mobile, but Google’s index is desktop
Google explained that it sees more mobile searches than desktop searches on a daily basis. But when Google looks to evaluate a page’s ranking in Google, it currently looks at the desktop version of the site — an issue we pointed out over a year ago. To fix this, Google will look at the content, links and structured data of the mobile version of your site if one is available.
Google wrote:
To make our results more useful, we’ve begun experiments to

Search Engine Land Source

Google dropping “Mobile-friendly” label from search results

Kashin / Shutterstock.com
Google says it is doing away with the mobile-friendly label that appears in search results. That does not mean that the mobile-friendly algorithm is dead, it just means Google is removing the label.
In its announcement, Google said that “85% of all pages in the mobile search results” now are mobile-friendly by Google’s criteria and thus they decided to declutter the search results by removing the label. The label launched officially in November 2014.
If you do not see your site with the mobile-friendly label, there is no need to worry. You can use Google’s mobile-friendly testing tool and/or check your mobile usability report in the Google Search Console.
Here is a screen shot of what the mobile-friendly label looked like up until today in the Google mobile search results:

The post Google dropping “Mobile-friendly” label from search results appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Search Engine Land Source

Google warns it will crack down on “intrusive interstitials” in January

Google has announced that it will begin cracking down on “intrusive interstitials” on January 10, 2017, because this type of ad “can be problematic on mobile devices where screens are often smaller.”
Google will be potentially penalizing — i.e., lowering the rankings — of these web pages. Google said “pages where content is not easily accessible to a user on the transition from the mobile search results may not rank as highly.”
Google explained which types of interstitials are going to be problematic, including:

Showing a popup that covers the main content, either immediately after the user navigates to a page from the search results, or while they are looking through the page.
Displaying a standalone interstitial that the user has to dismiss before accessing the main content.
Using a layout where the above-the-fold portion of the page appears similar to a standalone interstitial, but the original content has been inlined underneath the fold.

Here is a diagram from Google to

Search Engine Land Source

Google to boost mobile-friendly algorithm this May

ouh_desire / Shutterstock.com
Google announced on the Webmaster blog that they are going to be boosting the effects of the mobile-friendly algorithm they launched back on April 21, 2015.
Google said the update will happen “beginning in May,” and it “increases the effect of the [mobile-friendly] ranking signal.” Google said if you are already mobile-friendly, you do not have to worry, because “you will not be impacted by this update.”
When the update happens, it will roll out gradually, so you won’t see a major drop-off on non-mobile-friendly websites when the algorithm is pushed out. This kind of sounds like the slow Panda 4.2 rollout, but it is unclear if the rollout will take weeks or months. Google just said it would “start rolling out” the update in the beginning of May.
The mobile-friendly algorithm is a page-by-page signal, so it can take time for Google to asses each page, and that may be why it will be a gradual rollout.

Search Engine Land Source

Ad Age: Google Is To Launch AMP In Search Results On February 24, 2016

AdAge reports that Google’s AMP initiative will be taking off this coming Wednesday, February 24th.
That means that mobile searchers will begin to see AMP optimized content from publishers in the search results as soon as this Wednesday.
We knew this would launch in February 2016 but now we have the official date. As we described before AMP is designed to make web pages faster to load for users by slimming down a lot elements users need to download when visiting a web page. AMP has been adopted as a protocol by Google, Twitter and many other organizations and publishers. Google is launching AMP for their mobile results next month.
Recently Google released AMP error reports to help webmasters get ready to be AMP-friendly.
Richard Gingras, senior director, news and social products at Google told AdAge today “Clearly, AMP takes speed to a point of extreme so, obviously we look to leverage that. Again, it is only one signal. AMP doesn’t

Search Engine Land Source