[Podcast] The Google I/O 2017 recap: Lens, Assistant & more

The Google news was fast and furious last week, with numerous announcements coming from its annual developers’ conference, Google I/O 2017. The latest episode of our Marketing Land Live podcast offers a look back at some of the bigger announcements that will impact online marketers.
Much of the focus was on Google Assistant, the company’s smart/virtual assistant that originally powered Google Home devices and has since expanded to Android phones and — as of last week — the iPhone, too. Google made a number of updates to Assistant’s capabilities, including an interesting tie-in with yet another new Google product called Google Lens. That’s an AI-powered visual search tool that turns your smartphone camera into a pretty powerful search box.
We have audio explaining these new developments directly from last Wednesday’s Google I/O keynote, featuring Google CEO Sundar Pichai, along with Scott Huffman and Rishi Chandra.
This episode runs a little more than 15 minutes. You can listen here or use

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Google Assistant comes to iPhone, adds alerts, hands-free calling & more

Google Assistant was one of the stars of Wednesday’s keynote at I/O 2017. It’s gained a number of new features and expanded beyond its Android-based roots.
As expected, Google is making Assistant available on the iPhone, where it’ll compete with Apple’s built-in Siri — the original smartphone assistant — and Microsoft’s Cortana, which has its own iOS app. Assistant will be a standalone app that’s compatible with iPhones running iOS 9.1 or better.
Assistant is also getting a number of new features that I’ll describe below.
Notifications: Home will alert users when it has important information to share, beginning with things like traffic delays, flight statuses and reminders. The device won’t talk on its own but will light up when an alert is ready — much like the Alexa notifications that Amazon just announced for its devices.
Type to Assistant: Recognizing that not every situation is appropriate for talking out loud, users will be able to communicate with Assistant by typing

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What marketers need to know about Google assistant and Google Home

What started with Siri in 2010 is quickly leading to an age where consumers engage with the internet using only their voices, in much the way Captain Picard engaged with the computer on the USS Enterprise.
Google’s foray into voice search has been calculated and planned for years, according to Google CEO Sundar Pichai. It currently appears to be based on a closed system owned and overseen by Google, not on an open system like the trillions of websites that populate the internet are built on (i.e., HTML). I predicted this eventuality more than two years ago, after the Nest acquisition.
These are the problems and challenges brought by Google’s new assistant that marketers and SEOs alike need to be aware of.
Google I/O 2016 announcement
On May 18, 2016, Google announced Google Home, a speaker that houses the new Google assistant (Yes, it’s Google assistant with a lower-case a, not Google Assistant) platform and that resembles the Amazon Echo. The Home device seeks

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