Effective July 2018, Google’s Chrome browser will mark non-HTTPS sites as ‘not secure’

July is shaping up to be a big month for Google. Earlier this month, the company announced its Speed Update set to roll out in July, and today announced it will then also mark all sites that have not migrated to HTTPS as “not secure.”
This move will coincide with the release of Chrome 68 and will look like this in a user’s browser:
HTTPS warning in Chrome 68
Google has been pushing webmasters to make the change to non-secure web sites a for years now – including hinting at small rankings

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Google adds new SEO Audit category to Chrome’s Lighthouse extension

Webmasters, web developers and SEOs are getting a new feature in the widely used website auditing tool Lighthouse. Google announced today the addition of an “SEO Audits” category to the Chrome extension. You can access the new audit category via the “Options” button in the extension.
By no means a replacement for a comprehensive SEO audit, the new feature does provide feedback on basic/fundamental SEO best practices, returning a report that checks for:

Descriptive anchor text.
Titles, description.
If the page can be crawled by Google.
HTTP status code.
Valid hreflang and rel=canonical tags.
UX — legible font sizes, plugins.
… and makes recommendations for additional reports.

From a sample report I ran against Starbucks.com:
SEO Audit Report from Lighthouse Extension
According to the post, they’ll be adding more features to the SEO audit, and they are actively soliciting user feedback in the Github project and webmaster forum.
The post Google adds new SEO Audit category to Chrome’s Lighthouse extension appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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Moving to HTTPS? Don’t miss this unique opportunity!

Most SEOs have heard by now that moving web pages with forms to HTTPS is necessary to avoid being shown as “not secure” in Chrome 62.
Moving to HTTPS is a good step to take for a number of reasons, but there is also an unique SEO opportunity which is often overlooked — an opportunity that can significantly help your website with its SEO rankings, if done properly.
So, what is the opportunity? Moving to HTTPS will encourage Googlebot to recrawl most of your URLs. Googlebot has its own mechanism for determining and prioritizing which URLs to recrawl; however, when Googlebot detects a move to HTTPS, it tends to temporarily increase the crawl rate in an attempt to crawl as many URLs as possible within a short time frame. As such, this is a unique, one-time opportunity to improve your overall website’s signals in the Google Index.
Crawl budget
Most sites have a certain crawl rate, based on a number of

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Google’s Chrome will add new ‘Not secure’ warnings later this year

Google has announced new efforts within Chrome to encourage webmasters and site owners to move their sites to HTTPS. Later this year, Google’s Chrome browser will show a warning message on pages that have search boxes or forms to fill out.
[Read the full article on Marketing Land.]
The post Google’s Chrome will add new ‘Not secure’ warnings later this year appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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New study confirms Google doesn’t use Chrome browser data to discover new URLs

Stone Temple Consulting has published a new study supporting Google’s claim that it doesn’t use Chrome browser data for discovering new URLs for its search index.
The test was pretty simple: They created a “couple of pages that Google didn’t know about,” then they had “a bunch of people visit those pages from a Chrome browser.” They then waited to see if GoogleBot would visit the page to do a full crawl of the content, and GoogleBot never showed up.
Eric Enge, the CEO of Stone Temple Consulting, said the results showed “Googlebot never came to visit either page in the test… This is a remarkable result. Google has access to an enormous amount of data from Chrome, and it’s hard to believe that they don’t use it in some fashion.”
The post New study confirms Google doesn’t use Chrome browser data to discover new URLs appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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Google Search Console warns of nonsecure collection of passwords with upcoming Chrome browser release

This morning, Google began sending out notices through the Google Search Console to websites that have login and password fields on pages that are not over HTTPS. The notification says nonsecure Collection of Passwords will trigger warnings in Chrome 56 for domain.com.
Chrome 56 in January will issue a security warning for web pages that have these login fields without serving them on a page that is over HTTPS. The message reads:
Beginning in January 2017, Chrome (version 56 and later) will mark pages that collect passwords or credit card details as “Not Secure” unless the pages are served over HTTPS.
The following URLs include input fields for passwords or credit card details that will trigger the new Chrome warning. Review these examples to see where these warnings will appear, and so you can take action to help protect users’ data. The list is not exhaustive.
Google also posted about this on Google+ and wrote:
From the end of January with Chrome

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How to quickly find and export all subdomains indexed by Google

An SEO audit is rarely limited to the www (or non-www) version of a website. When looking for potential duplicate content, it’s often important to know how many subdomains exist and, more importantly, how many of them are indexed by Google.
The good old search operators
An easy way to find indexed subdomains is to use search operators.

Start with “site:” and the root domain.

One by one, remove each subdomain (including: “www”) from the results with the “-inurl:” operator.

When there are no more results for Google to return, your query with the search operators should include all subdomains indexed.

However, this technique has its limits. It’s unlikely that the site you’re auditing has as many subdomains as wordpress.com, but you may come across a site with several dozen subdomains. This can potentially cause the following issues:

The process can be long, especially if it needs to be done for several domains.
You might get Google “captchas” along the way.
The size of queries is limited (around 30 keywords).

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“OK Google” Dropped As Way To Perform Voice Searches In Chrome On Desktop PCs

You can no longer say “OK Google” and cause Chrome to perform a voice-based search, at least on desktop. The latest version has dropped this support.
As spotted by VentureBeat, buried in the developer documentation about changes to the latest version released — Chrome 46 — is a note that this has been removed:
Disable ‘Ok Google’ hotwording on desktop Chrome.
This feature has been removed completely from Windows, Mac and Linux
builds of Chrome. ChromeOS is unaffected.
Those who use Chromebooks — which are based on Chrome — still have this feature for their laptops. It also does not impact Chrome for mobile.
VentureBeat says it was removed due to lack of use.
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