To make every conversion count, count every conversion

Conversion measurement is complicated. More devices, channels and touch points mean that data is exploding, and yet cross-device behavior and the use of different identifiers, like cookies across browsers, can muddy measurement on the web.
With all of that imprecision comes a thought that might keep you up at night: You might not see all of the conversions driven by your marketing. They’re still happening, but you just might not capture them in your reporting.
As a performance marketer at heart, I’m frustrated any time my measurement is incomplete. Lost conversions are just about the saddest thing I can think of, but Google (my employer) has measurement tools designed to help you make the most of your conversion tracking.
Tracking every possible conversion in AdWords
Back in the desktop era, advertisers simply installed a conversion pixel on their checkout page, and the combination of redirects and third-party cookie reading at conversion-time accurately captured performance.
To keep up with changes in browser technology

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Monitoring web migrations: A checklist for moving from one site to another

Whether it is a website rebranding, a consolidation of different web properties or an HTTP to HTTPs migration, when you are implementing a structural web change, it is critical to monitor the crawling, indexing, rankings, traffic and organic search conversions on both the old and new web locations. Careful tracking will enable you to fix any potential problem as they arise.
Besides establishing a relevant strategy to follow that include search engine optimization (SEO) best practices, here are the most important areas and steps to monitor during the web migration stages.  Be ready to identify any issues that could cause a negative impact, while also identifying opportunities.
Getting started
Start tracking your organic search visibility on the old and new web locations at least a couple of months before the migration takes place.  This will make it easier to identify any unexpected and inconsistent behavior when the change happens.

Old vs. new web crawling
Let’s start with the most fundamental aspects to

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Placed introduces offline attribution for paid search campaigns

Google and Facebook both have offline attribution. Now, Snap-owned Placed is introducing what it says is the first “media-independent” solution for paid search campaigns. (Multiple companies have offline attribution for display).
Here’s the methodology as described by the company:
Placed Attribution for Search directly measures the search click through a redirect implemented by the advertiser. This click redirect allows Placed to map keyword clicks to its audience that generates over 140 billion latitudes and longitudes on a monthly basis. Placed’s location platform represents the largest set of active locations in the industry. Using these raw locations, and patented models to identify visits and assign them to places, Placed can directly connect paid search to store visits.
To showcase the new paid search attribution offering, Placed released the results of a case study with RetailMeNot. Paid search clicks, for various traditional retailers, went through a RetailMeNot landing page to enable the offline tracking.
The companies found that close to 40 percent (38 percent) of

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Locadium: a new ‘point solution’ to monitor GMB listings changes

LocalSEOGuide is releasing a new Google My Business monitoring tool called “Locadium.” It’s conceptually similar to other local listings monitoring services; however it’s exclusively focused on Google My Business (GMB).
Yext, Moz, Brandify, Vendasta, BrightLocal, SIMPartners, Chatmeter, among others, also provide local listings scans and monitoring. However, according to LocalSEOGuide founder Andrew Shotland, Locadium is the only tool that will monitor both the “front end” (consumer fields) and “back end” (API) of GMB. It sends alerts when there’s any change on to a company’s listing in any of the data fields.
It will be marketed to agencies, multi-location brands and SMBs. Pricing is variable for agencies and brands but for SMBs it costs $5 per month.

Similar tools on the market monitor local listings across the internet. However Shotland doesn’t see Locadium evolving into a broad-based listings monitoring service outside GMB. “We have no desire to compete with Yext,” he says. The appeal of Locadium is its focus and simplicity.

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Google Attribution: What search marketers need to know

One of the biggest announcements to come out of Google Marketing Next, held in San Francisco last week, was the release of Google Attribution. The new, free solution can pull in data from Google Analytics, AdWords or DoubleClick Search to provide a more holistic view of conversion actions across channels and devices for attribution modeling and bidding information.
Here’s a look at what this new solution means for search marketers.
What is Google Attribution?
Google Attribution is the simplified version of Attribution 360, the enterprise-level offering that came out of Google’s 2014 acquisition of multichannel attribution solution Adometry. It integrates with Google Analytics, Google AdWords and DoubleClick Search and doesn’t require any additional site tagging.
Marketers link a Google Analytics view that’s already associated with a Google AdWords or DoubleClick Search account. Once the account is set up, Attribution is populated with the channel performance data from the connected Analytics view.
Marketers can then assign an attribution model to their conversion events. And as in Analytics, it’s possible to

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A review of free PPC reporting solutions from Google

Doing PPC reporting right often involves some trade-offs between time and money. The perfect report takes a lot of time to build — time that could have been spent improving the performance of an account. A quick and repeatable report, on the other hand, is usually generated through a tool that costs money. So the arrival of Data Studio, which offers very customizable reporting, and now does so at a cost of $0, warrants an investigation to determine how it can help account managers.
Because the tool suite of my company, Optmyzr, also includes PPC reporting, spending the time to evaluate Data Studio made sense to me. So if you’re overworked and can’t really spare a few hours to look at Data Studio yourself, get my take on it here in a quick 10-minute read. I’ll even share a handful of cool reports you can make.
Why trust my opinion? Because my personal credibility in this industry hinges on

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Google Data Studio now connects to Search Console

Google’s reporting and data visualization tool, Data Studio, now integrates with Google Search Console.
Search Console joins AdWords and Google Analytics among others as a data source for report building. Marketers can build reports that include only Search Console data, or combine it with other sources to compare paid versus organic traffic trends, for example.

Search Console metrics can be aggregated by either site or by page in the Data Source creation flow within Google Data Studio by selecting either “Site Impression” or “URL Impression”.
As of last week, users can build an unlimited number of reports in Google Data Studio. The email used for the Data Studio account needs to have access to Search Console in order to use it as a data source.
The post Google Data Studio now connects to Search Console appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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6 common PPC reporting mistakes that can make you look terrible

 One of the most important elements of building a successful marketing career is to be a good communicator, and for PPC managers, that includes sharing insightful reports. At Optmyzr, my company, we generate a lot of reports on behalf of marketers, and we’ve learned a few things that might help you deliver better ones.
So here are five common reporting mistakes that make you look like a bad account manager, and how to fix them.
1. Reports sent too soon that always undervalue PPC
Reports you share with clients should show how good you are at PPC, but when you get overeager and send them too soon, you’re shooting yourself in the foot.
Due to the laws of physics and the space-time continuum, the conversion always happens after the click. In reporting systems, this means clicks (and costs) always show up before conversions (and sales value) so any KPIs using these metrics — like CPA and ROAS — start off looking

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New wave of referrer spam wrecking Google Analytics data

A new surge of referrer spam is damaging Google Analytics data sets. These attacks have rendered the Traffic Referrals report useless for many Google Analytics properties. The problem can even be so significant for small business sites that it seriously distorts the number of sessions and page views.
In the following example, lines 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 are all spam.
Referrer spam
Traffic report seriously distorted by spam
Why would attackers generate Google Analytics spam? Webmasters look at Google Analytics and frequently visit a site that appears in the data. Referrer spam can thus be used to generate traffic and sales leads, spread malware or conduct phishing attacks.
If you see a suspicious site in your referrer data, don’t visit it. Some attacks are just for the “lulz,” like this one:
Language spam
[Read the full article on Marketing Land]
The post New wave of referrer spam wrecking Google Analytics data appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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What’s new and cool at Google from SMX East 2016

At this year’s SMX East conference, which took place this week in New York City, Search Engine Land reporter Ginny Marvin and contributing editor Greg Sterling hosted a conversation with Google executives Jerry Dischler, the vice president of AdWords (@jdischler) and Babak Pahlavan, the global head of products and director of Google Analytics (@babakph).
Dischler shared recent updates and changes to the Google AdWords platform, while Pahlavan covered the same for Google Analytics.
[Read the full article on Marketing Land]
The post What’s new and cool at Google from SMX East 2016 appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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