Google updates Penguin, says now runs in real-time within the core search algorithm

After a nearly two year wait, Google’s Penguin algorithm has finally been updated again. It’s the fourth major release, making this Penguin 4.0. It’s also the last release of this type, as Google now says Penguin is a real-time signal processed within its core search algorithm.
Penguin goes real-time
Penguin is a filter designed to capture sites that are spamming Google’s search results in ways that Google’s regular spamming systems might not detect. Introduced in 2012, it has operated on a periodic basis.
In other words, the Penguin filter would run and catch sites deemed spammy. Those sites would remain penalized even if they improved and changed until the next time the filter ran, which could take months.
The last Penguin update, Penguin 3.0, happened on October 17, 2014. Any sites hit by it have waited nearly two years for the chance to be free.
Those long delays are now to be a thing of the past, according to Google. With this latest release, Penguin

Search Engine Land Source

Is a big Google search update happening? Chatter thinks so.

Have you checked your Google organic search traffic this morning? If not, you may want to. It seems Google may have tweaked their search ranking algorithm, your site may be ranking higher or lower or the same depending on if this update has impacted your web pages. Google has not yet confirmed the update but based on a lot of chatter in the search community, it seems like an update is indeed happening.
To be clear, it seems like there were two updates in the past twenty-four hours. The large update seems to be around core web search, which kicked off earlier this morning or late last night. The second update was likely around local rankings in Google.
Google core search ranking update
Again, Google has not confirmed that there was an update – we’ve emailed them this morning and we hope they get back to us soon. The search community overall seems to be debating that there was

Search Engine Land Source

With Panda in stealth mode, why Google’s quality updates should be on your algorithmic radar [Part 1]

In May of 2015, I uncovered a major algorithm update that I called “Phantom 2.” It ended up being a huge update that impacted many websites across the web globally. I’ll explain why it was named “2” and not “1” soon. Google first denied there was an update in early May 2015, but then finally explained that they did indeed roll one out. They said it was a “change to its core ranking algorithm with how it assesses quality.”
And with Google always looking to surface the highest-quality, most relevant information for users, that statement was incredibly important. This led the folks at Search Engine Land to call the May 2015 update Google’s “Quality Update.” (I still like Phantom, but hey, I’m biased!)
Note, and this is important: I called the update “Phantom” simply because it was a mysterious one. Google has not officially named the update Phantom, and from what I gather, they don’t like the name very

Search Engine Land Source


Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /home/betascom/public_html/ocston.org/wp-content/themes/bizznis/lib/frontend/post.php on line 312

Why real-time search algorithm updates may be bad news

Every update of Panda and Penguin in recent years has brought joy to some SEOs and sorrow to others. As the algorithms become real-time, the job of an SEO will become harder, and I wonder if Google has really thought of the consequences of these updates.
So, what potential issues may arise as a result of faster algorithm updates?
Troubleshooting algorithmic penalties
Algorithmic penalties are a lot more difficult to troubleshoot than manual actions.
With a manual action, Google informs you of the penalty via the Google Search Console, giving webmasters the ability to address the issues that are negatively impacting their sites. With an algorithmic penalty, they may not even be aware that a problem exists.
The easiest way to determine if your website has suffered from an algorithmic penalty is to match a drop in your traffic with the dates of known algorithm updates (using a tool like Panguin).
In the screenshot below, you can clearly see the two hits for Penguin back in May and

Search Engine Land Source

Google to boost mobile-friendly algorithm this May

ouh_desire / Shutterstock.com
Google announced on the Webmaster blog that they are going to be boosting the effects of the mobile-friendly algorithm they launched back on April 21, 2015.
Google said the update will happen “beginning in May,” and it “increases the effect of the [mobile-friendly] ranking signal.” Google said if you are already mobile-friendly, you do not have to worry, because “you will not be impacted by this update.”
When the update happens, it will roll out gradually, so you won’t see a major drop-off on non-mobile-friendly websites when the algorithm is pushed out. This kind of sounds like the slow Panda 4.2 rollout, but it is unclear if the rollout will take weeks or months. Google just said it would “start rolling out” the update in the beginning of May.
The mobile-friendly algorithm is a page-by-page signal, so it can take time for Google to asses each page, and that may be why it will be a gradual rollout.

Search Engine Land Source

Google Core Algorithm Updates Continue As SEOs Notice Weekend Google Update

Almost exactly like the week before, many SEOs and webmasters this weekend reported major ranking changes in Google.
Google was quick to answer that this weekend was the same as last, with ongoing updates to their Core Algorithm.
Gary Illyes from Google said on Twitter this morning that the weekend fluctuations were “core algorithm” and “not Penguin.”
Many webmasters are waiting for a Google Penguin update, and we are expecting it to happen early this year. So when we see major fluctuations, some are quick to say it is Penguin.
But Google is telling us this is not Penguin but rather just common core ranking algorithm updates.
The thing is, the past week or so has been pretty volatile in the search results for both the automated tracking tools and based on how the community is talking about it. But again, Google is saying it is not Penguin, it is core.
We have asked Google for more on these latest

Search Engine Land Source

Google: New Penguin Algorithm Update Not Happening Until Next Year

Although everyone, including us, was expecting the Google Penguin update to happen by the end of this year, Google just informed Search Engine Land that because of the holidays, the update won’t be released until next year.
A Google spokesperson told us today, “With the holidays upon us, it looks like the penguins won’t march until next year.”
The next Penguin update is expected to be real-time, meaning as soon as Google discovers the links to your site, be they bad or good links, the Penguin algorithm will analyze those links in real time, and ranking changes should happen in almost real time.
Penguin will continuously update, as opposed to SEOs and webmasters having to wait months or even years for Google to update it. The last official Penguin update, Penguin 3.0 happened on October 17, 2014, more than 13 months ago.
So webmasters will need to wait and be a bit more patient, as it won’t be released this year.
The post

Search Engine Land Source

Was “Phantom 3” A New Google “Quality Update” To Its Algorithm

Has there been another “Phantom” update? SEOs are buzzing in the belief there was, even though Google is denying anything has happened.
Buzz About Shifting Rankings
On November 19, 2015, there were unconfirmed reports of a Google search ranking update. Google’s John Mueller said on Twitter that Google had nothing to announce, adding that Google makes hundreds of changes per year.
Maybe Google made a big change and isn’t saying. Maybe Google did make one of those hundreds of changes always going on, which has shifted results noticeably for some. Or maybe nothing major really has happened, which is why Google has no news.
My view, as a close watcher of these things, is that it probably isn’t a Google Panda or Google Penguin update. Mueller probably would have said if it was either of those, as Google has typically confirmed them.
So was it a change to the main algorithm? It could be. We have had a number of other changes that it has eventually confirmed.
Phantom

Search Engine Land Source

How To Prep For The Pending Penguin Update & Ensure You’re Penalty Free In 2016

Gary Illyes, Webmaster Trends Analyst at Google, confirmed on Twitter that we’ll be graced with the next Penguin update before the end of 2015.

@Andrew_Isidoro yes
— Gary Illyes (@methode) October 28, 2015

This means that all of those webmasters who were hit by the last Penguin update (in December 2014, mind you) now have the chance of recovery, since historically, this update hasn’t been refreshed automatically.
This next Penguin update should also be a real-time version, so as Google detects spammy links, sites may be impacted immediately — and when spammy links are removed, those sites may see a more immediate recovery.
While I want to believe in my heart of hearts that spammy links aren’t an issue anymore, and the whole industry has adopted above-the-board, clean linking strategies, I know that’s not the case. With every algorithm update comes a host of winners and losers, and I’m sure this next Penguin release will be no different.
I know auditing your link profile isn’t always top-of-mind, especially

Search Engine Land Source

A Super Fresh Google Index? Server Errors & Rankings Impacts

Any SEO professional will tell you that server errors (defined as status codes in the 5xx range) on one’s website should be minimized. Generally speaking, if a page cannot be accessed by a search engine, it cannot be accessed by a user. Though server downtime is sometimes necessary to implement fixes and update websites, be sure to handle server downtime properly and serve a 503 response — but not for too long.
But how exactly do server errors impact a site’s search engine optimization? What effects, if any, do server errors have on search engine visibility and rankings?
In early 2015, the effects of a fresh index began to emerge. Our team collected data on 5xx errors and evaluated keyword rankings. The impacts were startling, specifically with 500 Internal Server Errors and 503 Service Unavailable Errors.
When a 500 response was encountered, the page could immediately drop from ranking. When a 503 response was encountered, the impacts were not immediate, and the 503 response needed to

Search Engine Land Source