Google officially adds AMP based featured snippets to mobile search results

Google has confirmed with Search Engine Land that last week they have rolled out the ability for AMP links to show up in the featured snippets section at the top of the Google mobile search results.
Google tells us this launched last week as some started noticing. Google did confirm again that AMP is still not a search ranking factor. The only change is that the featured snippet result can link to an AMP page.
Here is a screen shot of an AMP link showing in the featured snippets:

Google will still also show no AMP results in the mobile results:

But does Google prefer to show an AMP URL in the featured snippets? Well, as I said before, Google said AMP is not a ranking factor. But if you search for [how to use twitter] on desktop, instead of getting the Forbes result as shown on mobile, it shows a result from Wired, which is not AMP powered.
Here is a

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Google announces AMP speed and viewability enhancements for ads

Yesterday, Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) group announced enhancements to ads served in AMP. Specifically, the project has entered phase two of its three-phase plan for supporting comprehensive advertising functionality in AMP.
While phase one focused on basic support for ads within AMP, phase two focuses on speeding up AMP ad rendering, utilizing what they call “Fast Fetch” — separating the ad request from the ad rendering. Fast Fetch — vs. their previous method, “Delayed Fetch” — allows the ad request to happen while the page content is being rendered, and then only renders the ad before the ad slot is in view for the user.

From their announcement:

With Fast Fetch, ads are requested much earlier in the lifecycle of the page, allowing page rendering and creative selection in the ad server to happen in parallel. Fast Fetch is 850ms faster at the 50th percentile and 2.7s faster at the 90th percentile as compared to Delayed Fetch.

Ads

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Google making renewed effort to help news publishers drive more subscriptions

Google has always been treated by the news industry as a kind of frenemy. Many news organizations have a tortured history with Google, including some who’ve successfully lobbied against Google in Europe. Yet for roughly a decade Google has been trying to help publishers make more money while continuing to try and serve users and its own commercial interests.
Google news-industry outreach has taken multiple forms over the years. For example, in 2009 Google proposed a range of tools and services built around the notion of “micro-payments” to publishers. The proposal included multiple components, including search, e-commerce and advertising for news organizations.
Out of these efforts eventually came Google’s First Click Free program, whereby users could gain access to otherwise subscription-protected news content in search results — with the intention of improving the outlook for subscription revenue, though Google hasn’t uniformly enforced it. Google’s Consumer Surveys provide payments to publishers (take a survey for content access) and so on.
AMP is also

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What I learned from the Danny Sullivan/Gary Illyes keynote at SMX Advanced

On June 13, 2017, in Seattle, Search Engine Land’s Danny Sullivan sat down with Google’s Gary Illyes to talk about all things Google. You can read live blog coverage from the session here. In this post, I’ve organized the content of this session into topical groups and added my own analysis.
Note: The questions and answers appearing herein are not direct quotes. I am paraphrasing Sullivan’s questions and Illyes’ answers, as well as providing my interpretation of what was said (and including additional context where appropriate). I’ve also omitted some content from the session.
The featured snippet discussion
Danny Sullivan asked: Are we going to keep getting more featured snippets?
Illyes has no idea about that, but he notes that featured snippets are very important to Google. They want the quality to be really high, and one consideration people don’t normally think about is that, in some cases (e.g., voice search results), the answers may be read out loud.
This example is one of my

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Setting up and testing AMP for WordPress: A quick 7-step guide

In today’s mobile-centric world, having pages that load quickly is essential for satisfying the user. Not only that, but the effects of slow page speed have been correlated to a decease in overall revenue and an increase in page abandonment.
Users have come to expect mobile sites to load just as quickly as their desktop counterparts. In fact, Amazon, one of the largest online retailers, concluded that even a one-second lag in page load speed accounted for a $1.6B decrease in annual revenue.
Accelerated mobile pages (AMPs) are quickly becoming the standard for how a fast-loading page should be built. Using a pre-render, AMPs are able to load 15-80 percent faster than standard mobile pages without compromising functionality. While the ease of AMP implementation will vary depending on your CMS (content management system), WordPress can be a good test environment for previewing what your AMP page might look like.
Follow this quick seven-step guide to enable AMP for WordPress.
Note: Parts of this guide assume that you have activated the Yoast

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AMP — Accelerated Mobile Pages — rolling out to 1 billion more people in Asia

The big news coming out of Google’s AMP Conf in New York is that the mobile framework is set to roll out to a billion more people in Asia. Chinese search engines Baidu and Sogou are adopting AMP; so is Yahoo Japan.
Google’s VP of Search and AMP lead David Besbris gave the morning keynote address and made the announcement. The addition of these Asian search engines will mean a billion more people potentially using AMP.
AMP launched in October 2015 and since that time has seen significant publisher and developer adoption. There are hundreds of millions of AMP-enabled documents across multiple geographies around the world. More than 10,000 developers have contributed code to the project.
Baidu, Yahoo Japan and Sogou join a growing list of content publishers and e-commerce companies using AMP. They include Bing, eBay, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Tumblr, WordPress, The Weather Company, Eventbrite, Shopify, Fandango, TripAdvisor, Disney, Food Network and numerous others.

Adobe reported last month that top US publishers

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Google ‘related picks’ now showing under some top stories carousels

Google has added a new feature to the top stories carousel named “related picks.” Related picks may show up under the top stories AMP carousel, and aims at giving searchers another way to expand their queries to see even more top story content.
If you search on mobile for a news-oriented keyword phrase, the top stories AMP carousel will likely show up. Then below that carousel, there may be a new section named “related picks.” Clicking on the phrases below the related picks will expand to show you more top stories carousel items.
Here is a picture of the feature collapsed:

When you click on one, it expands and shows you more top stories:

Hat tip to @glenngabe for spotting this.
The post Google ‘related picks’ now showing under some top stories carousels appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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Links to AMP content are showing up outside of search results

The Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) standard was designed to bring the fast-loading, clean experience of native apps to the open web. With most large publishers now producing AMP versions of their content, distribution platforms and other referrers are starting to experiment with AMP as an alternative to standard outbound links and app web views.
Publishers might see this trend in their AMP referral analytics. At Relay Media, we’ve tracked an increase in non-Google referrals to the AMP content we convert for publishers — beyond the usual traffic from users sharing AMP links on social media. Here are our top non-Google referral sources over the past five months:
Google Analytics weekly sessions, October 9, 2016, through February 18, 2017
Google still represents about 80 percent of total AMP referral sessions to Relay Media’s platform, with another 8 percent categorized as “(direct) / (none)” in Google Analytics. Identifiable non-Google sources represent around 10 percent of total referral sessions. It’s a modest piece of the pie, but

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Google temporarily disables ‘not mobile-friendly’ label in search results due to bug

Kashin / Shutterstock.com
Google has confirmed that they have temporarily disabled the ‘not mobile-friendly’ label in the mobile search results due to a bug. John Mueller of Google said that Google has turned “the label off for now” but it “should be ok soon.”
This is in response to Google mislabeling pages as not mobile-friendly over the past 24- hours in the mobile search results. Even AMP pages were labeled as not being mobile-friendly. John Mueller said that “this is a bug on our side” and Google is working on fixing it.
Here is a screen shot of Google labeling an AMP page as not mobile-friendly:

Here is a screen shot of an AT&T page being marked as not mobile friendly:

But the Google mobile friendly testing tool showed it at the same time as being mobile friendly:

So this is clearly a bug, Google said it is an issue on their end, and for now, they have turned off the label from

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